Cheese Search Results
Brie
Wisconsin has become an important source of Brie for American consumers. French cheese producers have chosen to make this cheese in Wisconsin because the composition of milk closely resembles that of the French regions. The bloomy rind on Brie results from Penicillium Candidum, a white mold applied to the surface. The mold produces enzymes which ripen the cheese from the outside in and occurs in just a matter of weeks, giving this cheese a rich, earthy mushroomy flavor that changes from mild when young to pungent with age. Available plain and flavored, Brie has a soft and creamy interior with a snowy white edible rind.
Camembert
Wisconsin has become an important source of Camembert. French cheese producers have chosen to make this cheese in Wisconsin because the composition of milk closely resembles that of the French regions. The bloomy rind on Camembert results from Penicillium Candidum, a white mold applied to the surface. The mold produces enzymes which ripens the cheese from the outside in and occurs in just a matter of weeks. This cheese, with the soft, creamy interior and snowy white edible rind, has a rich, earthy mushroom flavor that becomes more pungent with age.
Rush Creek Reserve
Made only in the autumn, as the cows transition from the fresh pastures of summer to the winter's dry hay, Rush Creek Reserve is designed to show off the richer texture of hay-fed milk and the delicate ripeness of a soft, young cheese. Made from raw milk, the cheese is bound in spruce bark, which gives shape to the soft round and imparts a sweet, woodsy flavor to the cheese. Combined with the savory flavors born from the rind, this gives the custard-soft paste a deep but delicate richness, reminiscent of beef broth or finely cured meat.