Platter of Cold Pack

A Wisconsin tavern owner first made this Wisconsin original by blending natural cheeses without the aid of heat to provide his customers with a spreadable cheese for snacking. Since taverns were called clubs, and owners packed the cheese in crocks, this Wisconsin original became known as club or crock cheese. A variety of flavors are available.



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Similar to natural cheese from which it is made


Smooth, spreadable


Similar to type of natural cheese from which it is made Sometimes flavored with fruits, vegetables, meats or spices


Serve "as is" with fresh vegetables, crackers and breads. Make a twice-baked potato with real zip – blend potatoes with flavored cold pack. For an accent, add a speck of horseradish or garlic; sprinkle the top with shredded cheddar. Makes excellent hash browns. Prepare frozen hash browns; top with onion cold pack and place in oven until melted. Serve as a quick base for cheese sauces. Simply blend with small amounts of cream or milk and heat in a double boiler or in a microwave oven on medium power.


Beer: Ciders & Fruit Beers


How should you prep your cheese for best incorporation in your dish?
  Cold Surface Broil Oven-Recipe Oven-Surface Direct Heat
Sliced iconSliced
Cubed iconCubed
Shaved iconShaved
Shredded iconShredded
Grated iconGrated
Crumbled iconCrumbled
Spooned/Spread iconSpooned/Spread



Performance Notes - Monterey jack cold pack in assorted flavors is available from Wisconsin, perfect for making your own cheese balls, logs and clever shapes for merchandising. Unlike other process cheeses, no heat may be used to process cold pack; therefore, it should be stored refrigerated.

Recipes with Cold Pack