Jamie Fahrney

Jamie received his cheesemaking license in 1985 after serving as an apprentice under the legendary Wisconsin cheesemaker, Al Deppeler. He continued under the expertise of Master Cheesemaker Myron Olson at Chalet Cheese Cooperative, the only U.S. plant that produces Limburger cheese. Today, he holds Master Cheesemaker certifications for Baby Swiss and Brick cheeses. Jamie says it's the combination of the incredible challenge, knowledge and intuition required to consistently produce top-quality cheese that hooked him early on. Jamie and Chalet's crowning moment came in the 2006 World Championship Cheese contest, where he received the first place blue ribbon in the Baby Swiss Class.

Cheese Produced

Baby Swiss
Wisconsin cheesemakers traditionally produce Baby Swiss from whole milk, unlike traditional Swiss cheesemakers, who make it from partially skimmed milk. Whole milk gives Baby Swiss a creamier texture and a more buttery, slightly sweet flavor, which makes it ideal for melting. Sweet Swiss, a rind cheese produced in Wisconsin, is a cross between Baby Swiss and Jarlsberg®, a Norwegian Swiss. Swiss cheese is also available smoked.
Brick
Brick is a Wisconsin original, first made by John Jossi around 1877. Some Brick cheeses resemble Germany’s surface-ripened Beer Cheese or Beer Käse. Brick was named for its shape and because cheesemakers originally used bricks to press the moisture from the cheese. Wisconsin leads the nation in the production of Brick and surface-ripened Brick. The bacteria that cheesemakers apply to surface-ripened cheeses, known as a smear, helps to develop the full, earthy flavor that has just a touch of nuttiness when young but turns pungent and tangy when aged.

Company

Chalet Cheese Cooperative
N4858 Hwy N
PO Box 788 (Mailing address)
Monroe, WI 53566
Phone: 608-325-4343
Fax: 608-325-4409

Sales Contact:
Myron Olson
608-325-4343

Myron Olson

Myron has been crafting cheese for over 40 years. For over 20 years he has been the manager of Chalet Cheese Cooperative which is the only cheese factory in the United States producing Limburger cheese. He is certified in Limburger and proudly states, "there are still plenty of people who appreciate a fullflavored cheese." Additionally, he's a Master in Baby Swiss and Brick cheeses, as well as the holder of many awards in cheesemaking. These cheeses are marketed under the Country Castle and Deppeler brands, as well as several retailer brands.

Cheese Produced

Baby Swiss
Wisconsin cheesemakers traditionally produce Baby Swiss from whole milk, unlike traditional Swiss cheesemakers, who make it from partially skimmed milk. Whole milk gives Baby Swiss a creamier texture and a more buttery, slightly sweet flavor, which makes it ideal for melting. Sweet Swiss, a rind cheese produced in Wisconsin, is a cross between Baby Swiss and Jarlsberg®, a Norwegian Swiss. Swiss cheese is also available smoked.
Brick
Brick is a Wisconsin original, first made by John Jossi around 1877. Some Brick cheeses resemble Germany’s surface-ripened Beer Cheese or Beer Käse. Brick was named for its shape and because cheesemakers originally used bricks to press the moisture from the cheese. Wisconsin leads the nation in the production of Brick and surface-ripened Brick. The bacteria that cheesemakers apply to surface-ripened cheeses, known as a smear, helps to develop the full, earthy flavor that has just a touch of nuttiness when young but turns pungent and tangy when aged.
Limburger
Limburger, first introduced in Belgium, was made in the Liege region and sold in Limburg. The Germans began making Limburger and later naturalized it, making themselves the sole producers in Europe. This assertive cheese complemented their taste for highly-flavored game and meats. Today, a single cheese plant in Monroe, Wisconsin, produces all the surface-ripened Limburger made in the United States. This famous "stinky" cheese has a pungent, strong aroma.

Company

Chalet Cheese Cooperative
N4858 Hwy N
PO Box 788 (Mailing address)
Monroe, WI 53566
Phone: 608-325-4343
Fax: 608-325-4409

Sales Contact:
Myron Olson
608-325-4343

Bruce Workman

Holding the most Master certifications of any craftsman in the state, Bruce has honed his skills over more than three decades. An aspiring chef before discovering a passion for making cheese, he was first certified as a Master in 1999 for Gruyère and Baby Swiss. He subsequently returned to the program to graduate in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011 with additional certifications. He is now a Master in the production of Butterkäse, Havarti, Raclette, Emmental, Specialty Swiss, Brick and Muenster as well. "The program continues to broaden my knowledge and the networking with the other cheesemakers is phenomenal," he says. "We're all working toward the same goal of producing great cheese."

Cheese Produced

Baby Swiss
Wisconsin cheesemakers traditionally produce Baby Swiss from whole milk, unlike traditional Swiss cheesemakers, who make it from partially skimmed milk. Whole milk gives Baby Swiss a creamier texture and a more buttery, slightly sweet flavor, which makes it ideal for melting. Sweet Swiss, a rind cheese produced in Wisconsin, is a cross between Baby Swiss and Jarlsberg®, a Norwegian Swiss. Swiss cheese is also available smoked.
Brick
Brick is a Wisconsin original, first made by John Jossi around 1877. Some Brick cheeses resemble Germany’s surface-ripened Beer Cheese or Beer Käse. Brick was named for its shape and because cheesemakers originally used bricks to press the moisture from the cheese. Wisconsin leads the nation in the production of Brick and surface-ripened Brick. The bacteria that cheesemakers apply to surface-ripened cheeses, known as a smear, helps to develop the full, earthy flavor that has just a touch of nuttiness when young but turns pungent and tangy when aged.
Butterkase
Butterkäse originated in Germany and is made throughout Germany and Austria. Its name literally means "butter cheese." Although it contains no butter, it has a butter-like texture and is very mild and creamy. It is also called Dämenkäse or "ladies cheese" because it is delicately flavored, odorless and complementary to most foods. Butterkäse, produced in Wisconsin in the Alpine tradition, is readily available throughout the United States.
Emmentaler
Named for Switzerland's Emmental valley, Emmentaler is widely recognized for characteristic holes the size of marbles, or even larger, that develop throughout the body of the cheese during the ripening process. Made with raw milk in old-fashioned copper kettles, Emmentaler is traditionally made in 200-pound wheels and aged 10-12 months where it develops a waxy, light golden appearance and a tangy taste.
Gruyère
Since the 11th century, cheesemakers in the Alpine area between Switzerland and France have produced Gruyere. The pride and joy of the region, this cheese received its name from the town of Gruyeres in the Swiss canton of Fribourg. Today, Wisconsin cheesemakers produce award-winning, hand-crafted Gruyere using classic Swiss production techniques and hand-crafted copper vats. Surface ripened with an inedible brown rind, the cheese is aged in specially-designed curing rooms to give it a nutty, rich, full-bodied flavor and firm texture.
Havarti
Havarti is a milder version of German Tilsit that was first made popular in Denmark. Many cheesemakers in Wisconsin produce a product similar to its Danish cousin. The Center for Dairy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a special Wisconsin-style Havarti® that is firmer in texture and more buttery in flavor than other types and is available plain and flavored.
Muenster
Historians believe that Muenster originated in Alsace, France. Others give the honor to its neighbor, Germany. In Wisconsin, Muenster was among the first semi-soft cheeses European immigrants made in the late 1800s, and Americans quickly developed a taste for it. Wisconsin Muenster tastes milder, and the firmer texture helped it gain popularity as a slicing cheese for sandwiches. Traditionally a washed-rind cheese, in the United States the rind may or may not be washed. It usually has a bright orange natural annatto coating and is mild when young and mellows with age.
Raclette
Semi-hard with tangy, buttery, full, fruity flavor.
Swiss
This full-flavored, buttery, nutty cheese with characteristic holes is aged at least 60 days. Interestingly, American cheesemakers, not Swiss, modernized Swiss production. About 50 years ago, the only way to protect Swiss wheels as they ripened was to allow a hard rind to form. The advent of plastic packaging, which keeps moisture in but allows carbon dioxide to escape, made it possible to produce rindless Swiss cheese in blocks. Rindless blocks were developed for better yield in foodservice; retailers appreciate the higher yield and ease of cutting.

Company

Edelweiss Creamery
N890 Twin Grove Rd
Monroe, WI 53566
Phone: 608-938-4094
Fax: 608-938-4095

Sales Contact:
Shirley Knox
608-938-4094